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Rules For Successful Communication with Free Resource

Everyone wants to believe his words matter. It’s only human nature to want to believe, even when it’s not true. Exam your message and your words in selling. What’s the intent behind them? Do you know the Rules for Successful Communication?

“It’s not what you say that matters, it’s what they hear…”
This is a quote from Frank Luntz, book…Words that Work.

When talking to prospects and customers, wouldn’t you agree it’s more important to be understood?

As I said, we all want to believe our words matter in selling. The truth is….Use words that work…words your prospects and clients can hear and understand.

What do I mean?

If you’re selling insurance, are you using words and phrases from the insurance industry? If so, it could be very confusing for your prospects. Insurance is confusing enough…I know, I sold insurance over the last 39 years!

It may make perfect sense to you…It may make you appear as an authentic insurance expert, BUT if your prospect doesn’t understand..well…so much for you being an expert. Instead of asking questions for clarification, the prospect will move on to someone who can make it easier for him to understand…why? Because it’s human behavior not to admit you don’t understand something.

Instead…ditch the industry lingo and talk in simple terms and concepts. Not because the prospect is “simple” because simple equals easy. If you make it easy for the prospect, chances are, they’ll buy from you.

Here are three of the rules from Dr. Frank Luntz’s Rules for Successful Communication. For sake of time, you can find the other 7 rules below.

1. Simplicity: Use Small Words. Avoid words that might cause you to reach for the dictionary. Instead, they’ll either let your real meaning sail over their heads or, worse, they’ll misunderstand you. And even worse than that…they won’t buy from you.

2. Brevity: Use Short Sentences. “Be as brief as possible. Never use a sentence when a phrase will do, and never use four words when three can say just as much.”

3. Credibility Is As Important As Philosophy. “People have to believe it to buy it. As Lincoln once said, you can’t fool all of the people all of the time. If your words lack sincerity, or if they contradict accepted facts, circumstances, or perceptions, they will lack impact.”

In my article Words Win Sales…

Words are the most under researched area in sales training. And many sales people search for the magic in sales. The magic is your words. Specifically the words you use in selling. How much thought have you given to the words you use? Have you given any thought to WHY certain words and phrases should be used in selling?

Read the rest of the article here.,,

AND…Did you know….

According to a 1983 Guinness Book of World Records the longest sentence had 1,288 words. That record has long been surpassed, in English at least, by Jonathan Coe’s The Rotter’s Club, which ends with a 33-page-long, 13,955 word sentence.

Wow…I don’t even want to read that sentence!

Words matter but make it brief!

Question: Do you have your own personal rules of communication…if so, share them below in the comment section…

Frank Luntz’s Rules for Successful Communication

1. Simplicity: Use Small Words. Avoid words that might cause your readers to reach for the dictionary. They likely won’t bother to look up unfamiliar words. Instead, they’ll either let your real meaning sail over their heads or, worse, they’ll misunderstand you.

2. Brevity: Use Short Sentences. “Be as brief as possible. Never use a sentence when a phrase will do, and never use four words when three can say just as much.”
3. Credibility Is As Important As Philosophy.
“People have to believe it to buy it. As Lincoln once said, you can’t fool all of the people all of the time. If your words lack sincerity, if they contradict accepted facts, circumstances, or perceptions, they will lack impact.”
4. Consistency Matters.
“Repetition. Repetition. Repetition. Good language is like the Energizer Bunny. It keeps going . . . and going . . . and going.” Find a good message and stick to it. Coke created “It’s the real thing” in 1943. Wheaties created the “Breakfast of Champions” tagline in 1935, the same year Campbell’s Soup came up with “M’m! M’m! Good!”
5. Novelty: Offer Something New.
Businesses should try to tell customers something that gives them a brand-new take on an old idea. If successful, the new message will bring a “sense of discovery”. If your message generates an “I didn’t know that” response, you have succeeded.
6. Sound and Texture Matter.
“The sound and texture of language should be just as memorable as the words themselves.” For example: Alka-Seltzer’s “Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is” and M&M’s “Melts in your mouth . . .”
7. Speak aspirational.
“Messages need to say what people want to hear. This is the one area where politicians often have the edge over the corporate community. It’s very difficult to craft advertising language that touches people at the most fundamental, primal level, by speaking to their deepest hopes, dreams, and fears.” The key to success is to “personalize and humanize the message to trigger an emotional remembrance”.
8. Visualize.
“The slogans we remember for a lifetime almost always have a strong visual component, something we can see and almost feel. Allstate’s ‘You’re in good hands’, first created in 1956, went so far as to include the cupped hands visual in its logo to remind people of its peace-of-mind guarantee.
9. Ask a Question.
“‘Got Milk?’ may be the most memorable print ad campaign of the past decade. The creator realized . . . that it’s sometimes not what you say but what you ask that really matters.”
10. Provide Context and Explain Relevance.
“You have to give people the ‘why’ of a message before you tell them the ‘therefore’ and the ’so that.’”

I highly recommend reading Frank’s book…Words that Work.

ClICK HEREto receive a downloadable resource for your use! Then watch the video below!

 

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